Wednesday, March 11, 2009

At the Copa...

Those of you following me on Twitter know that I've been in a bit of a musical time warp lately, humming Barry Manilow tunes under my breath and thanking God I work at home where no one else can hear me. Mock all you want, but the guy knows how to pen a catchy tune, and in these gray days of March I'm all about anyone singing about Daybreak and letting the sun shine, shine, shine all around the world.

I received flowers on Saturday night--completely out of the blue--and I'm amazed by how much they've sustained me after spring hinted at it's arrival and then dove back under three days of weather than only the U.S. Postal Service enjoys. I don't know much about flowers; I can't identify many beyond a basic rose or tulip. But I'm really surprised by how happy this bouquet on my desk has made me over the past few days. It's like a visual reminder that this is just a gloomy season--it's not forever, spring ALWAYS comes--and that color like this will soon burst out all over the place. Let's just say that I'm ready for a burst of color.

The flowers are starting to get that musty smell now, so I think today is the last day of their reign in my office. But it's been nice having this pick-me-up to, well, pick me up.

In the midst of this, I'm reading a collection of essays by David Foster Wallace, who committed suicide last September. It reminds me that none of our pick-me-ups last forever, that we all need to find that thing that keeps us going long-term. I wish DFW had stuck around. I would have worked hard to finagle some sort of conversation with him--I mean, he conducted press interviews with big-name publicity outlets at his local KMart after one of his books came out. That's just funny. Instead, I'm reading everything he put to paper, and thinking about how capturing thoughts like this creates a legacy, no matter when or how your life ends. Grim, but strangely encouraging. Especially when I'm humming, Her name was Lola, she was a showgirl...

Okay, let's end on a happy note: What's your favorite Barry Manilow tune?

11 comments:

Mrs. F said...
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EMBurke said...

His jingle for McDonalds, hands down, has to be his most famous and instantly recognizable by anyone living on the planet during the past forty years: "You deserve a break today, so get up and get away..." It's not too surprising that it has become so familiar considering that it closely resembles "When you wish upon a star."

Sarakastic said...

I've been meaning to pick up more DFW works. I only read one of his essays, it was a commencement speech that he gave about water & was one of the best things I've read & I've read a lot. I found out about his death after I read it & it made me sad because I would've loved the possibility that someday we could meet & be best friends.

Nancy said...

I read your blog regularly, but this is the first time I've commented. I can't believe you got me to bite with a post about Barry Manilow.

A couple of years ago, a friend offered my husband and I tickets to any concert we wanted to see at one of the casinos. I saw that Mr. Manilow was going to be in town and thought he'd probably put on a fairly decent show. I cannot begin to describe how soundly I was mocked for suggesting that we go to see him.

Oh, and Weekend In New England, by the way. From back in the day when I was living in PA, hundreds of miles away from my boyfriend/fiancee.

Love your writing. Good to know there are others out there who appreciate a little Barry Manilow smarm now and then.

kim said...

Mandy. I named my dog after this song when I was little. Ok, I kind of named her after this song. This song inspired the name Brandy. I loved Brandy.

Liza said...

I love Barry Manilow songs. I have several favorites, but I guess my most favorite ismI Write the Songs.

Angie said...

"Weekend in New England" with "Even Now" a close second, and then a little known song called "Who Needs to Dream" from a tv movie back in the early 80's.

Amy said...

That's a tough one...I'm partial to "Mandy," since that was the first one I saw him play on TV as a kid, but I will have to go with "Could It Be Magic," which doesn't get a lot of attention these days. I remember my piano teacher ranting about the "audacity" of this pop musician stealing Rachmaninoff for the intro!

Crissy said...

Amy,

I hate to tell you this but your music teacher wasn't very good if he mistook Chopin's Prelude In C Minor for Rachmaninoff. Incidentally, Eric Carmen used part of one of Rachminonoff's pieces to write All By Myself and then several years later, Barry used part of that same piece for the bridge for If I Should Love Again. Could It Be Magic is my favorite song of Barry's by the way.

Amy said...

I stand corrected. The error was entirely mine, not dear Mrs. Fischer's (may she rest in peace)!

Stephanie said...

Can I assume you too share my affinity for Barry Manilow?? Anyway, a toss up. "Can't Smile Without You" has some real sentimental value to me because at my husband's 25th surprise party a few years ago, to get the karaoke going I thought it a genius idea to belt out, "Can't Smile Without You." It went well until I burst into tears after getting overcome with emotion about how much I really love my husband. Can you say, "nerd?" It was a real memory maker and for the record, it kicked off the karaoke and I had to pay the dj to stay 2 extra hours! Ps Weekend in New England and Daybreak are right up at the top too!